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Need a new roof over your head? Which types of roof materials are you considering?

If you’re not even sure where to start, start right here. This guide tells everything you need to know about the different types of roofing materials.

You’ll learn the pros and cons of each type of roof, including how long it lasts and how expensive it is. And we cover both sloped roof types and flat roofs as well.

So, which is the best type of roofing material for you? Find out from this guide.

Types of Roof Materials For Sloped Roofs

Sloped roofs are the most popular choice for homes, so we’ll cover these first. Also, if you’re replacing a roof, know that your new roof doesn’t have to be the same type as your old roof.

Asphalt Shingles

There are many good reasons why most neighborhood houses are built with asphalt shingle roofs. Namely, they’re both cheap and very protective against the weather.

Also, they’re not very heavy. So they require no special reinforcement when installed.

Plus, they last about 15-20 years and require almost no maintenance. And extreme heat or cold has little effect on them.

However, shingles of any kind might be a bad idea for locations that frequently have strong winds. Such weather can blow the protective shingles right off the roof, making the roof more susceptible to moisture damage.

Metal

Metal roofs are also very affordable and low-maintenance. And they’re extremely resilient to the elements and even natural disasters.

Plus, there are many varieties of metal roofing materials to consider. This gives you a bigger price range to choose from compared to other roof types.

It also means that some types of metal roofing will last longer than others. But they should last at least 50 years or more. Some types, like copper or zinc, can last over 100 years.

There is one significant drawback, though. Whenever rain or hail hits your metal roof, it makes a very loud racket that you’ll hear all throughout the house.

Types of Roof Materials like Metal

Wood Shingles or Shakes

Many people prefer the look of wood shingles to asphalt shingles. But, if you want them, be prepared to pay more upfront and do some maintenance work each year. Mostly, this means keeping your roof clear of debris like dirt and leaves.

Failure to maintain your wood roof could accelerate its decay. But, if you do maintain it well, it can last up to 30 years.

The difference between wood shingles and shakes is that shingles are shaped by machines while shakes are cut manually. This really only affects how they look. They are both just as protective of your home.

 

Clay or Concrete Tile

Tile roofing is a heavy-duty option that will last you 50 years or more with little maintenance. It’s also very heavy and so will require special reinforcement to hold it up.

But, besides longevity, most people pick tile roofs for how they look. That is, they look notably classier than asphalt shingles or metal roofs. However, that also means they’re quite expensive.

Types of Roof Materials to consider

Slate Tile

To get an idea of what slate roofs are like, take everything we just said about clay/concrete tile roofing and double it. That is, slate is extra heavy, extra expensive, and will last at least 100 years. It’s also breathtakingly gorgeous.

Types of Roofing Materials For Flat Roofs

Now, let’s take a look at some flat roofing types. Although they’re less popular, they have plenty of unique benefits that shouldn’t be overlooked.

Built-Up Roofing

Probably the most common type of flat roof is built-up roofing (BUR). As its name implies, it’s made of asphalt sheets piled several layers high. Each sheet covers the entire area of the roof.

As you can guess, this roof is both very heavy and very weather-resistant. It’s also fire-retardant and strong enough to be used as a floor for rooftop activities. Plus, it’s very affordable and will last 15-20 years.

The biggest drawback of BUR is the installation. It’s loud, smelly, and messy—like road construction on top of your house.

Modified Bitumen

Modified bitumen roofing was designed as an upgrade to BUR. The material itself is very similar to asphalt but not the same thing.

But it’s much lighter and easier to install than BUR, partly because this roofing only requires 2 layers. This also makes it very affordable.

And yet, it’s just as weather-resistant as BUR, too. Plus, modified bitumen roofing can also be used as an outdoor floor.

Thermoplastic Membrane (TPO)

Unlike the first two flat roofs we’ve covered, this type requires only one layer of roofing membrane. The membrane consists of an artificial material called Thermoplastic Polyolefin (TPO).

Although this roof is extremely lightweight, it’s also powerfully resistant to weather. Plus, it’s significantly resistant to UV rays and bacterial growth.

It’s hard to say how long it will last, though, as the technology is still somewhat new. But, when it does need replacing, it can be recycled.

Thermoset Membrane (EPDM)

This roofing membrane has similar properties to TPO but is made of a rubber-based material. Not only is it lightweight, but it’s also a very good insulator.

It, too, is resistant to UV rays and is easy to install. Plus, it should last you up to 50 years. However, hot weather might cause it to warp or tear.

Need Some More Information About the Different Types of Roofing Materials?

We hope this guide has answered all your questions about the different types of roof materials. But, if you still need to know more, don’t hesitate to ask the experts of Trinity Roofing and restoration.

Give us a call: 281.782.7116 or contact us for price quotes or other information. You can also find the answers you’re looking for on our FAQs page.